Model-Based Definition, Model-Based Enterprise,
PMI and 3D-GD&T™ Training and Consulting Services

Annotated Model Product and Manufacturing Information (PMI) Limited Dimension Drawings

Product and Manufacturing Information (PMI); Model-Based Definition (MBD); Model-Based Annotation; Limited Dimension Drawings; 3D-GD&T™. These concepts and the techniques to use them are all discussed in our latest course and materials on ASME Y14.41 and ISO 16792 and Using 3D Solid Model CAD Data as Design Deliverables.

Annotated Model with Product and Manufacturing Information (PMI)

Our goal is to help you understand and adopt the techniques found in ASME Y14.41-2003 and ISO 16792: 2006, and the content we created for the IHS Drawing Requirements Manual – 11th Ed. – 2008.

In 2008, Bryan revised and created the 11th Edition of the IHS Global Drawing Requirements Manual, which includes a new 82-page chapter about PMI, MBD, 3D-GD&T™ and Using Solid Models and Digital Data as Design Deliverables. Our goal is to help you understand these standards, and how to successfully implement their rules and techniques for applying PMI and Model-Based Annotation to Annotated Models.

The ASME Y14.41-2003 and ISO 16792: 2006 standards cover the three scenarios listed below for the ways digital data, 3D Solid Model data, 3D PMI and Model-Based Annotation may be used. However, the ASME Y14.41-2003 and ISO 16792: 2006 standards do not address several real-world requirements that are needed by industry. Additionally, ASME Y14.41-2003 and ISO 16792: 2006 did not address several topics germane to modeling. These requirements and topics are addressed in our courses and our consulting services, and discussed in the IHS Global Drawing Requirements Manual – 11th Ed.

Our training is set up to help you, your company, your suppliers and your customers get on the same page with regards to using Solid Model CAD Data as all or part of your deliverable or Technical Data Package. We discuss all aspects of using Digital Data as an engineering deliverable, including the format requirements, process considerations (both upstream and downstream), standardization requirements, new tools and techniques, and pitfalls to avoid in your implementation. We can help you annotate and set up your CAD data to work within your Model-Based Enterprise. Our training covers the methods, rules, tools and techniques for working in diverse digital data environments. Different industries work differently, different companies have different requirements, and there are different needs between the departments in a company. To address these differences, our material addresses three Design Deliverable scenarios:

Our training covers the methods, rules, tools and techniques for working in diverse digital data environments. Different industries work differently, companies have different requirements, and there is even difference between different departments in a company. To address these differences, our material addresses three Design Deliverable scenarios:

Drawing with 3D-GD&T™, PMI and Axonometric View: Drawing as Deliverable

  1. A 3D CAD Solid Model is created, a 2D Drawing is created based on the Model, and the Drawing is the Design Deliverable.Complete product definition resides in the Drawing.Historically this method has grown to become the norm and is still the most common case today. Most engineering departments working in mechanical and product design use 3D CAD software to create a 3D Solid Model of the design, but still rely on a 2D Drawing as the official deliverable. To move from this scenario requires careful consideration of all downstream processes, and development of methods to ensure that everyone will still be able to do their job if the deliverable is changed.Drawing with 3D-GD&T™, PMI and Axonometric View: Drawing and Model as Deliverable
  2. A 3D CAD Solid Model is created, a 2D Drawing is created based on the Model, and the Model and the Drawing are used together as the Design Deliverable.Some of the product definition resides in the Model, and some of the product definition resides on the Drawing.This is a more recent development, and most common in environments where complex geometries are developed, such as consumer electronics, aerospace structures, and automotive industries. These products all share complex geometries, and present a common problem – how to define increasingly complex shapes on a 2D Drawing. This scenario is a midpoint, a step along the path to a fully-digital world. This scenario recognizes that the model geometry may be shared with downstream applications, such as coordinate metrology software and devices (CMM), Computer-Numerically Control (CNC) software and machinery, and takes advantage of this connectivity by leveraging the 3D data for these applications.Annotated Model with 3D-GD&T™ and PMI: Model as Deliverable
  3. A 3D CAD Solid Model is created and the Model is Annotated. The Annotated Model alone is the Design Deliverable. Complete product definition resides in the Annotated Model.This is where we are headed. Eventually all design data will be developed, communicated, and stored virtually. Most companies today are somewhere in the area of scenario 2 above. Some industries are leading the way toward full digital implementation, trying to leverage their data to the maximum. This is a noble goal. Remember – the model-alone is not enough. Let us help you get to the next step.

There are many things to consider, and many pitfalls that lie in the path to success in this digital-only scenario. Let us help you along the path to becoming a Model-Based Enterprise.

Important Concepts and Terms:

Annotated Model with 3D-GD&T™ and PMI:
Model-Based Definition (MBD)
ASME Y14.41-2003: ISO 16792: 2006

Annotated Model
An Annotated Model is a 3D CAD Solid Model that contains annotation and certain attribute entities in addition to geometric entities. Most 3D CAD Solid Models contain only geometric data – the geometry of the model itself. Of course these 3D CAD Solid Models are built upon supporting data, such as the data used in the construction of the geometry, including entities such as 2D sketches, constraints, parametric relationships, etc. An Annotated Model includes other information that historically resided on an Engineering Drawing, which in this context is called Model-Based Annotation, such as explicitly-specified dimensions, tolerances, GD&T, surface texture symbols, finish requirements, welding symbols, notes, revision symbols, etc.

PMI: Product and Manufacturing Information
PMI (or 3D PMI) is a common term used in industry and other standards to describe all of the digital data associated with a product, including design (definition) data, analytical data, manufacturing data, inspection data and all other related data. The term is typically used in situations where the digital data is used as the design deliverable and by downstream process.

Model-Based Annotation
Model-Based Annotation is the annotation applied directly to an Annotated Model. Model-Based Annotation is the collection of all the explicitly shown dimensions, tolerances, 3D-GD&T™, surface texture symbols, finish requirements, welding symbols, notes, and all the other annotation and attribute entities that are required to complete product definition, and in some cases process definition.

MBD: Model-Based Definition
MBD is a common term used in industry to describe situations where a product is partially or fully defined using digital data (most often 3D solid model data). Like PMI (and 3D PMI), the term is typically used in situations where the digital data is used as the design deliverable.

Limited Dimension Drawing:
Partial Model-Based Definition (MBD)

Limited Dimension Drawings
Limited Dimension Drawing is a common term used in industry in cases where the design deliverable consists of a drawing and an associated digital data file. A limited dimension drawing is typically not fully-dimensioned, and a note or other means directs the reader to obtain missing dimensional data from the associated CAD data (usually a 3D Solid Model Data file). An example note may read “Obtain values for all undimensioned surfaces by measuring CAD model file #123-xyz,” or something similar.

PMI, MBD, and Advanced Applications of Solid Modeling Seminar

Want to Learn More? Contact us to learn more about our 3D PMI, MBD, and Advanced Applications of Solid Modeling Seminar, which covers 3D-GD&T™, Model-Based Applications, and Using 3D Data as Design Deliverables. Check out our Seminar Page for information about this and our other Seminars. Contact Us to schedule an onsite course at your company. We are glad to help!

3D Solid Model with In-Situ Sectional View:
Model-Based Definition (MBD)
ASME Y14.41-2003: ISO 16792: 2006

This Seminar presents an overview of the methods, concepts, rules and techniques for using PMI, MBD, digital data and Limited Dimension Drawings as design deliverables, including traditional, partially- and fully-annotated solid models, based on the ASME Y14.41 and ISO 16792 standards and custom material developed by Advanced Dimensional Management.

Do you want to learn the latest techniques, tips, and guidelines for reducing engineering documentation and taking maximum advantage of Digital Data and Annotated Solid Models in the workplace? Do you want to learn what it takes to effectively communicate the requirements for parts and assemblies while minimizing the need for paper drawings? Do you want to reduce design cycle development time? Do you ever ask yourself “What is the best way to dimension and tolerance this complex-shaped part?” If you answer yes to any of these questions, this Seminar is for you!

Seminar Highlights:

  • Digital Product Definition and Solid Modeling
  • Shortening the Design and Documentation Development Cycles
  • The ASME Y14.41 Standard
  • Scenarios for Engineering Deliverables in the 21st Century
    • Scenario 1: Drawing as Design Deliverable
    • Scenario 2: Model and Drawing as Design Deliverable
    • Scenario 3: Annotated Model Data Set as Design Deliverable

Annotated Model with 3D GD&T™
Geometric Tolerance Zones Shown for Training
ASME Y14.41-2003

  • Effects on Industry
  • Effects on the Design, Manufacturing, Inspection, and Assembly Processes
  • Challenges of Implementation
  • Solid Models, Data Sets, and Techniques and Guidelines
  • Axonometric (Isometric, etc.) Views in Engineering Documentation
  • Annotation Techniques and Guidelines
  • Dimensioning and Tolerancing and GD&T Techniques and Guidelines
    • New Tools & Methods
  • Using Annotated Solid Models in the Workplace

3D-GD&T™, Annotated Solid Modeling, and Using Digital Data Reference Materials Available:

Drawing Requirements Manual: 11th Edition; Bryan R. Fischer -  Author 11th Edition Engineering Standards, Drawing Standards, ASME Y14,  Y14.100, Y14.5, ANSI Y14, ANSI Y14.5, GD&T, ASME Y14.41, Y14.24, 3D  Solid Modeling, Digital Data Definition Practices, Castings and  Forgings, Reference Manual© Advanced Dimensional Management LLC, IHS  Global, Inc. - 2008 In 2008, Bryan revised and created the 11th Edition of The IHS Drawing Requirements Manual, and wrote an extensive new chapter on PMI and Advanced Applications of Solid Modeling, which includes 3D-GD&T™ and using digital data as deliverables in industry.

This is a book in itself. It is based on the ASME Y14.41-2003 and ISO 16792-2006 standards, and MIL-DTL-31000C, and includes material on using PMI, 3D-GD&T™, and 3D digital data in industry, and on annotating 3D assemblies and weldments, which is not yet addressed in any of the standards.

R&D Leaders in 3D-GD&T™, PMI, Model-Based Definition (MBD) and Model-Based Enterprise (MBE)

We are subject-matter experts working on international research and development projects developing new techniques and tools for 3D product definition and using 3D data in the workplace. We work with many CAD and other software companies to help them improve their software and comply with the various ASME and ISO standards that affect their products. We also work with industry to help them understand their needs in the area of 3D MBD and help them increase their use of 3D in the supply chain, and to migrate toward a fuller implementation of the Model-Based Enterprise. We have been active in many R&D projects over the last five years in the area of 3D product definition and the digital workplace. We are also active members in the development of several new standards for 3D data, data quality, and 2D and 3D software validation programs.

ISO 10303 STEP standards are being expanded and new STEP standards are being developed to improve and enhance current capabilities and data interoperability between CAD systems and other software systems. Part of the focus of these new STEP capabilities is the inclusion of 3D PMI in the data model, both visually and as semantically-modeled data. New capabilities are also being added to JT and PDF software standards and formats to allow greater support for and implementation of PMI.

For more information about these topics, see the online version of Bryan Fischer’s article in the March 17, 2011 edition of Machine Design Magazine, The Changing Face of Model Annotation.

Please Contact Us for more information about how we can help you understand and implement 3D-GD&T™, Annotated Models, Model-Based Annotation, Model-Based Definition, the ASME Y14.41-2003 and ISO 16792: 2006 standards, and the other techniques needed for success in this vital new area.

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Bryan R. Fischer is President of Advanced Dimensional Management LLC in Sherwood, Oregon, offering leading-edge training and consulting in Dimensioning and Tolerancing, GD&T, Tolerance Stackup and Analysis, Dimensional Management, Design, Standards and Quality.

Bryan and our other trainers are ASME Certified Senior Level GD&T Professionals. Bryan and others are members of several ASME sub-committees. Bryan a member of the ASME Y14.5 Sub-committee Support Group, the US TAG to ISO TC213 which develops ISO GPS (GD&T, etc. standards, and directly involved in developing the ASME Y14.5 standard and ISO 1101 and 5459 standards. He is recognized as a leading authority in the theory and application of Dimensioning and Tolerancing, GD&T, Tolerance Analysis and Stackups and Dimensional Management.

He is a published author, having written several books on Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing, Tolerance Stackups and Tolerance Analysis. His books “The Journeyman’s Guide to Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing: GD&T for the New Millennium” now in its 12th revision, the GD&T Update Guide: ASME Y14.5-2009: Changes, Improvements, and Clarifications, and the GD&T Visual Glossary will be used as the basis for the seminar. His book “Mechanical Tolerance Stackup and Analysis,” now in its second edition (CRC Press 2011) is the preeminent title on Tolerance Stackups and Tolerance Analysis available.

In 2008 Bryan revised the 11th Edition of The IHS Global Drawing Requirements Manual (the DRM), and wrote an extensive new chapter on using Digital Data as Design Deliverables and Annotating Solid Models. This is a book in itself, and is based on the ASME Y14.41-2003 and ISO 16792-2006 standards, and includes material not found in either of those standards. We are leaders in 3D Model-Based Product Definition (3D MBD) and 3D Model-Based Enterprise (3D MBE) Implementation techniques training and consulting. Check out our Books and Materials section and our 3D PMI, MBD, and Advanced Applications of Solid Modeling Seminar and other 3D MBD and 3D MBE courses for more information.